Books

Review: How To Be Invisible by Kate Bush Rating 82%

Review: How To Be Invisible by Kate Bush

An unusual title, with songs selected and arranged by the author, and compelling introduction by novelist David Mitchell, How To Be Invisible presents the lyrics of Kate Bush published together for the first time. A book that is akin to a poetry collection, except David is correct, you cannot help yourself but sing along to the lyrics that you know, recollecting those beloved songs from this cherished singer/songwriter.

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Review: My Name Is Monster by Katie Hale Rating 68%

Review: My Name Is Monster by Katie Hale

My Name Is Monster first attracted my attention, as I was aware of the name Katie Hale, through the poetry scene, and it’s dystopian flavours appealed, but this is at it’s heart a story of survival, which is never really fully explained, and a character that I’m not sure develops with all that goes on around her.

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Review: The Dollmaker by Nina Allan Rating 73%

Review: The Dollmaker by Nina Allan

Nina Allan’s third novel, The Dollmaker, is an exploration of human nature, love and connections. But it is also so much more than that. Nina Allan’s novel delves deep into what it is to be an outsider and how people overcome past tragedies and traumas and she does that through the main characters of the story Andrew and Bramber and their passion for dolls.

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Review: My Grandma and Me by Mina Javaherbin and Lindsey Yankey Rating 78%

Review: My Grandma and Me by Mina Javaherbin and Lindsey Yankey

It is around this time of year that we are encouraged to consider the females that raised us, our mothers and grandmothers, and this picture book also has this slant to it, although interestingly set in Iran. And as an advocate of picture books, I find this delicately handles that relationship between grandmother and granddaughter but even more sensitively the acceptance of difference and the warmer, humane sides, we can often forget to display as beings.

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Review: Ann Cleeves & Alex Gray, Aye Write 2019 Rating 95%

Review: Ann Cleeves & Alex Gray, Aye Write 2019

What is better than a Friday evening spent in the company of two of the best British crime writes? Not much and AyeWrite! Knows it. The Mitchell Theatre opened its doors and it welcomed a full room of crime book lovers who were queueing to see Ann Cleeves and Alex Gray and they certainly got an evening to remember.

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Review: Admissions by Henry Marsh Rating 69%

Review: Admissions by Henry Marsh

The follow-up to the successful and acclaimed Do No Harm, Admissions is a much more personal title from neurosurgeon, Henry Marsh, with much turmoil and debate about death and practice, as he ponders on the more personal and less professional side to it, although it’s clear that this personal approach does have a domino effect on the professional. A well written and informative book on the highs and lows of performing surgery for a living, Admissions is a very open and honest account.

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Review: My Enemy’s Cherry Tree by Ting-Kuo Wang Rating 72%

Review: My Enemy’s Cherry Tree by Ting-Kuo Wang

A man who has come from very little, from poverty and loss, not only finds himself a beautiful wife, but also a job in the vein of car sales, excelling in this field. When she vanishes without a trace, he sets up a small café in her favourite spot on the edge of the South China Sea, hoping that one day she’ll return.

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Review: Once Upon A River by Diane Setterfield Rating 95%

Review: Once Upon A River by Diane Setterfield

What a special literary treat it is when you find a book, which upon finishing, you need to think about for hours, and days, and weeks for simply starting a new one is out of the question. Such a book is Diane Setterfield’s new novel Once Upon a River. Setterfield ‘s new book takes place in the 19th century around the river Thames and the river is as much a character as the people we get to meet throughout the story.

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Review: Frank Turner, Aye Write 2019 Rating 73%

Review: Frank Turner, Aye Write 2019

Smash!: Green Day, The Offspring, Bad Religion, NOFX, and the ’90s Punk Explosion), Frank Turner took to the stage of a sardine-packed Mitchell Library theatre, to discuss his new title Try This At Home. Folk-punk icon Frank Turner’s book explores his song-writing process by stripping apart thirty-six songs from his vast back catalogue, and this event not only saw him discuss it. It was an event for his fans, as he also performed a plethora of tracks before the evening drew to a close.

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Review: Gary MacLean, Aye Write 2019 Rating 90%

Review: Gary MacLean, Aye Write 2019

Scotland’s national chef, Gary MacLean, combined forces with AyeWrite! this year and the result was a great event that discussed Gary’s life but also touched upon very important topics regarding our food culture and the way we view and practise healthy living.

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Review: Helena Kennedy, Aye Write 2019 Rating 90%

Review: Helena Kennedy, Aye Write 2019

A last-minute room change is required at Glasgow Royal Concert Hall, the accompanying venue to the Mitchell Library for the ever-growing Aye Write book festival, due to the popularity of this event. Baroness Helena Kennedy of the Shaws QC, to give her full title, is introduced by chair Ruth Wishart by her unofficial title: the petite firecracker, and is greeted by loud cheers – “I’m from a large family,” Kennedy jovially explains, “and most of them are here tonight.” They are here to listen to the distinguished human rights lawyer discuss her latest book, Eve Was Shamed: How British Justice is Failing Women, the follow-up she didn’t imagine she’d have to write to her 1993 publication Eve Was Framed: Women and British Justice, an exploration of how courts treat women. Unfairly, is the conclusion.

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