Reviews

Review: Mrs Death Misses Death by Salena Godden Rating 87%

Review: Mrs Death Misses Death by Salena Godden

Few books do you race through for it having the prose and the imagery that won't allow you to put it down. Salena Godden's debut novel Mrs Death Misses Death is precisely one of those titles, intoxicating and life-affirming simultaneously, a title that grabs you with the first word, caresses you in parts with an occasional punch in the guts, until you race to the end. For a debut it's a extraordinarily vital read.

Features

Matty James Cassidy: I think people need music now more than ever

Matty James Cassidy releases new single Old Souls, from his well-received debut solo album of the same name. The track is a darkly poetic rock ‘n’ roll outing, reflected in the Peaky Blinders vibes of the video. Matty spoke with The Fountain about the track, the album and his wish for all venues to weather the Covid storm.

Books

Latest
Review: Mrs Death Misses Death by Salena Godden Rating 87%

Review: Mrs Death Misses Death by Salena Godden

Few books do you race through for it having the prose and the imagery that won't allow you to put it down. Salena Godden's debut novel Mrs Death Misses Death is precisely one of those titles, intoxicating and life-affirming simultaneously, a title that grabs you with the first word, caresses you in parts with an occasional punch in the guts, until you race to the end. For a debut it's a extraordinarily vital read.

Music

Latest

Matty James Cassidy: I think people need music now more than ever

Matty James Cassidy releases new single Old Souls, from his well-received debut solo album of the same name. The track is a darkly poetic rock ‘n’ roll outing, reflected in the Peaky Blinders vibes of the video. Matty spoke with The Fountain about the track, the album and his wish for all venues to weather the Covid storm.

Film

Latest
Review: The Lady in the Portrait Rating 35%

Review: The Lady in the Portrait

With The Lady in the Portrait, French director Charles de Meaux takes a dazzling but conservative approach to dramatise a real-life occurrence: in 18th century China, Jesuit monk Attiret (Melvil Poupaud) is a court painter under Emperor Qianlong of the Qing Dynasty. With its stiff rituals, closed-off palace grounds and social rigidities, life is a lot like it would be in Versailles, although Attiret and his fellow Jesuits repeatedly struggle with the courts’ mocking dabs at the Christian God and idea of chastity. Things start to stir when, during a memorial for the Emperor’s late wife, the new Empress Ulanara (Chinese superstar Fan Bingbing) has a bout of jealousy and decides to commission a Western-style portrait of herself to rekindle her husband’s interest (not an easy task in a palace brimming with a regular influx of pretty substitutes). Attiret gets the job – while quietly giggling onlookers and critics breathe into his neck during the first couple of sessions, they soon thin out to leave him and Ulanara in a setting of ‘inappropriate’ intimacy.

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